Feminist economics posts

The secret behind Ghana’s economic growth

I traveled 3000 kilometers through Ghana after the annual IAFFE conference. This resulted in several aha-erlebnissen, as is so neatly expressed by the inhabitants of the winning country of the World Championship football. In my journey, I strikingly recognized what I teach and write. Women carrying heavy head loads, pumping drinking water, selling products on […]

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The IMF on gender and macro policy: Feminist economics education recommended

Women need access to income and, as a result, they need good jobs. That is not news. But according to the IMF (Elborgh-Woytek, et al. 2013), the breaking news is that having more women in paid work will make our economies grow faster. So far, so good. But what about the emphasis on good jobs? […]

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The Conundrum of Women’s Economic Empowerment in MENA

Thanks in large part to Nelson Mandela, the world came to understand the malice of apartheid. But alas, economic apartheid in South Africa remains neither understood nor close to being resolved. The country continues to be divided into the “haves” and “have nots.” Ironically, but not surprisingly, the division falls along the same racial lines […]

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The Real Obamacare Story: States’ rights and wrongful exclusion

On October 1, 2013, two key provisions of the US Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) designed to extend health insurance to the close to 41 million uninsured Americans took effect. The one that garnered all the political and media attention was the individual mandate provision, requiring individuals with no insurance to buy private health insurance […]

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Booming urban India, stagnating female labor force participation: What gives?

Stephan Klasen and Janneke Pieters India’s economy has grown fast over the past two decades as women started having fewer children, schooling rates increased rapidly accompanied by decline in the education gender gap, and the labor market returns to education increased. Despite these changes, all of which should have promoted rising participation, urban women’s labor […]

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Esther Duflo on “women’s empowerment and economic development”: a must-read for feminist economists?

Esther Duflo is a “risen star” in the field of behavioral economics and specializes in the use of quantitative experimental methods to study human behavior. While many of her papers touch on gender-related issues, a recent paper (Journal of Economic Literature 2012) addresses a question of central concern to feminists: what is the relationship between […]

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Crowdfunding: a feminist funding revolution?

Crowdfunding is big. Crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter, which in 2012 raised over US$300 million from more than two million funders, and Indiegogo are spreading throughout the world. In early November 2013, the US Securities and Exchange Commission proposed over 500 pages of regulations on crowdfunded activities. It is time to ask ourselves whether crowdfunding has […]

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Work–Family Balance Policy alla Turca

On October 30, 2013, in the opening ceremony of the National Economics Congress in İzmir, Turkey, Prime Minister Erdoğan announced economic policy targets for 2023, the 100th year of the Turkish Republic. Among them: the lofty goal of increasing GDP to US $2 trillion (from $786 million), thereby placing Turkey among the top-ten highest GDP countries […]

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IAFFE: A Home with a Garden

My life in North America began when I started writing my Ph.D. dissertation at McGill University on gender and development. McGill was the only university in Canada that admitted me – a woman from Iran, who wanted to write her thesis on Iranian women at the height of the Iran–Iraq war. However, it did not […]

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Demography in the News—Beware of Rogue Trends

In August 2013, Time Magazine ran the following cover story: “The Childfree Life:  When having it all means not having children” by Lauren Sandler.  Sandler begins the piece with three statistics about US fertility whose job it is to convince us that the author has uncovered something new and newsworthy: a trend towards childlessness in […]

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