Feminist economics posts

The persisting challenges of measuring women’s work: a Bangladesh story

Written with Simeen Mahmud Policymakers operate with a very truncated view of the economy—with little idea of how growth impacts, or is affected by, women’s work. Part of the problem is the ongoing exclusion of the unpaid care work from international definitions of economic activity.  This means that for the most part they fail to […]

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Tony Atkinson’s feminist proposals to reduce inequality

In his latest book, simply titled “Inequality – what can be done?”, Tony Atkinson not only provides a thorough analysis of economic inequality in the UK and other Western countries. He also puts forward some bold proposals to reduce inequality. And, a few of these have clear feminist character. His book, dedicated to “the wonderful […]

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Feminist Economics and Policymaking

I am thrilled to start contributing to the International Association for Feminist Economics blog, Feminist economics posts. I signed up to contribute because I’d like to engage in a discussion with you about feminist economics within the context of today’s public policy debates. Every day, I get up and—with my amazing team at the Washington […]

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New Wave of Austerity Puts Gender Equality (and the SDGs) at Risk

When Agenda 2030 was adopted in September 2015, women’s rights organizations were pleased to see much of what they had been advocating reflected in the new agenda. Moving beyond the narrow goals and targets of the MDGs, not only has the process of defining the new agenda been more inclusive, and its scope universal and […]

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How Do Bedouin Women Fare in Israel’s Naqab/Negev?

We are opening up the Feminist economics posts blog for continued conversation on the Comment & Rejoinder by Robert Cherry and Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, et al.  in the latest issue (volume 21, issue 4, Oct 2015)  of Feminist Economics. Both articles are currently FREE access to encourage further conversation. Download the comment and rejoinder by clicking […]

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Echoes from UN-FFD3 Conference: The Limits to Financing for Gender Equality

This week, governments from all around the world are gathering at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit to adopt the Agenda 2030. They will commit to pursue sustainable development for all, including by reaching a new set of goals. In this process, the inclusion of a stand-alone goal on gender equality, with specific targets, as well […]

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If You’re Happy and You Know It

The political debate over the proposed Paycheck Fairness Act of 2014 and a flurry of recent popular culture pieces in the “Can Women Have it All?” debate (e.g. Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In, Deborah Spar’s Wonder Women, and Anne Marie Slaughter’s “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All”) remind us that the feminist ideal of gender […]

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The latest step toward expanding equality for LGBT employees

Several weeks ago, President Obama took a big step toward equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in the U.S.  He signed an executive order that forbids employment discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity by federal contractors that sell goods and services to the U.S. government.  This marks the first time […]

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Teaching feminist economics to gender-blind policymakers in Hanoi

Feminist economists have an impact on policy; however, those impacts are not often immediately apparent. I was starkly reminded of this when, in early August, I had the opportunity to do a day’s teaching on “Gender and the Economy” in English and Vietnamese to the Ho Chi Minh National Academy of Politics and Public Administration […]

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Hierarchy of needs or synergy of goals?

In a recent article in Foreign Affairs, Marc Bellemare (1) joins the current debate on aid effectiveness, arguing for a targeted approach that focuses on basic needs and raising incomes. Other endeavors—such as gender equality, environmental sustainability, breastfeeding, cookstoves, and an independent media—are a distraction, he argues, and will, in any case, automatically follow once […]

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